'; ICES20 at Mekelle University: 20th International Conference of Ethiopian Studies
Geralta mountains

20th International Conference of Ethiopian Studies (ICES20)
Mekelle University, Ethiopia

"Regional and Global Ethiopia - Interconnections and Identities"
1-5 October, 2018

ICES20 logo

Use the "back" button of your browser to return to the list of abstracts.

NARRATIVES AND PRACTICES OF THE ETHIOPIAN GREEN ECONOMY. ON PROCESSES OF POLICY MOBILITY AND LOCAL EMBEDDEDNESS. [Abstract ID: 0609-05]

Camilla BERGLUND, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
DESALEGN Wanna, Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia

This paper aims at discussing the Ethiopian green economy through the lens of transformational agenda of the Growth and Transformation Plans. Discussions focus on identified impacts of policy narratives in the practices of Green Growth/Economy strategies that have currently been underway in Ethiopia. We limited our critical review to the two important sectors of the economy, namely agriculture and forestry in view of the current greening of the growth narratives that holds sway. Particularly we explore the expressions of the global green economy discourses through the Climate Resilient Green Economy (CRGE) and REDD+ initiatives of Ethiopia. We employ a poststructuralist approach as a methodological frame, by proceeding through the questions guiding the approach of What´s the problem represented to be. At the core of the approach is problem representations and how these have come into being, i.e., the act of governance, what is left outside or silenced, and what kind of effects on society and environment. The discourse and ownership of knowledge is hence of central concern, as is also the cultural context in which different knowledges diverge and converge in policies governing the everyday life of people. Discussions will further elaborate on assemblage theory to understand how micro- and macro levels of the green economy policy discourse merge together, (re)produce inclusionary and exclusionary practices, and are embedded into national contexts.